Time to scout for peanut pests

by Mark Abney, University of Georgia

Things have been relatively quiet in terms of insect pressure in most peanut fields so far in 2017, but that could change quickly.

I have been getting reports of heavy caterpillar pressure in some areas of Florida, and agents and consultants are reporting that a mixed bag of loopers, velvetbean and other caterpillars have shown up in Georgia over the last week. I strongly encourage growers to scout their peanuts and only make insecticide applications when caterpillars reach the economic threshold. Continue reading

Surprise attack by redbanded stink bugs inspires new thresholds in Mississippi

by Bonnie Coblentz, MSU Extension Service

A game-changing insect caused significant problems in many Mississippi soybean acres, but good management allowed growers to finish the year with an average crop.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated that by Oct. 23, Mississippi farmers were 92 percent finished harvesting the state’s soybean crop, which covered about 2.03 million acres this year. Insect and disease pressures made the effort challenging, but USDA predicts growers will harvest a state average of 48 bushels an acre. Continue reading

Take care of sugarcane aphid populations early

In Southwest Farm Press

By Ron Smith, Southwest Farm Press

If sugarcane aphid populations are allowed to hit 250 per leaf, they’ve reached a point of no return and farmers will suffer economic loss from numbers that high, says Michael Brewer, Texas AgriLife Extension entomologist at Corpus Christi.

“Things happen fast, but the plant doesn’t die immediately,” he told audiences recently at both Bryan and Commerce, Texas, during meetings of the Texas Plant Protection Association and the Texas Ag Technology Conference, respectively. Continue reading

Tarnished plant bugs unusually high in Georgia

From Southeast Farm Press (there are photos too)

By Phillip Roberts, University of Georgia entomologist

Recently we have received reports of immature tarnished plant bugs in some fields; this is rarely observed in Georgia cotton. Unlike cotton production areas in the Mid-South, tarnished plant bug is an uncommon and sporadic pest of Georgia cotton.

Tarnished plant bug populations have been higher than normal and more insecticide applications have targeted tarnished plant bugs than usual during 2014.

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North Carolina farmers should consider treatment options for plant bugs

In Southeast Farm Press

Cotton squaring and flowering is a few weeks away, and now is a good time for North Carolina farmers to think about treatment options for plant bugs, according to North Carolina State University Extension entomologist Dr.  Dominic Reisig.

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A single Palmer amaranth is way too many, say Arkansas scientists

How much damage can one little Palmer amaranth seed cause?

A lot, according to research done by weed scientists at the University of Arkansas, who set out to document both the distribution patterns of Palmer amaranth and its impact on cotton yield. Their findings led them to recommend a zero tolerance threshold for the weed.

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Cold winter didn’t deter kudzu bugs in NC

The following is directly from the North Carolina soybean blog, written by Dominic Reisig, entomologist:

I have been monitoring a kudzu patch in Edgecombe Co. since late April this year.  As expected, adults from overwintering flocked to kudzu to feed, mate and lay eggs.  These adults were produced from last year’s batch and survived our colder than normal winter with ease.  Around the middle of May, most adults had died and 99% of the terminals had 30-50 eggs laid by these adults.

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