Pros and Cons of Cover Cropping for No-till Vegetable Production: Making sense of current research and past experiences

No-till vegetable production offers a more sustainable approach to weed management than the frequent use of herbicides and tillage, and also promotes soil health. Because cover crop based no-till vegetable production involves a different approach to management, growers may be reluctant to transition from conventional tillage without seeing the system in action and knowing its costs and benefits compared with conventional tillage. In this workshop Clemson University specialists will discuss the pros and cons of cover cropping and no-till with recommendations based on current research and our experiences in the field over the past decade.

May 17TH, 2018, 8:45 AM – 3:30 PM Continue reading

Grazing improves soil health, study finds

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Dr. Richard Teague might be considered a cowboy of a different kind. He’s not rounding up stray cattle, but rather wrangling the best management practices on ranches to help the cattle and their owners.

Teague, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research ecologist at Vernon, grew up on a farm and knows firsthand there are some unintended consequences from traditional long-standing agricultural practices that might not readily be seen. Continue reading

Cover crops can be beneficial with informed decisions

In Southwest Farm Press

A cover crop used in conjunction with a conservation tillage system may help conserve soil and improve soil health, fertility, water quality, weed/disease/pest control, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat.

But it requires “educated management decisions,” says Paul DeLaune, Texas AgriLife Research agronomist at Vernon, Texas. He discussed ongoing cover crop research on the Texas Rolling Plains during the Red River Crops Conference. Continue reading

NCSU experts says tillage provides better Italian ryegrass control

in Southeast Farm Press

Researchers at North Carolina State University are looking to cultural practices as a way to help control Italian ryegrass in wheat.

In 2014 and 2015, N.C. State scientists examined how row spacing and tillage practices impact Italian ryegrass in wheat. “We didn’t see any result with row spacing. If Italian ryegrass is going to come in, it’s going to come in regardless how dense that wheat is,” said N.C. State Extension Weed Specialist Wes Everman, speaking the Northeast Ag Expo Small Grain Field Day in Elizabeth City. “The tillage practices are where we saw some real differences.” Continue reading