Southeastern tobacco succumbing to tomato spotted wilt

In Southeast Farm Press

by Chris Bickers, Southeast Farm Press

Any hopes that the U.S. tobacco crop might escape serious damage from tomato spotted wilt were dashed at the end of May and in early June when substantial infestations broke out in Georgia and the Carolinas.

Jerry Breland of the Walterboro area of South Carolina was one of the farmers reeling from the intensity of the hit his flue-cured had taken from the disease. He talked to Southeast Farm Press on June 9. Continue reading

Invasive species likely to remain a big problem

In Southeast Farm Press

by John Hart, Southeast Farm Press

Agriculture must take action now to manage the possible onslaught of new organisms, new insects and new diseases that is expected to escalate.

“One thing that is very clear is our world today is getting smaller at least figuratively,” said Tim Brenneman, a professor of plant pathology at the University of Georgia in Tifton, Ga., in an address to the annual meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Society in Clearwater, Fla., July 14. Continue reading

Tomato spotted wilt virus has not been put “to bed”

In Southeast Farm Press

by Bob Kemerait, University of Georgia

Peanut growers hoped tomato spotted wilt virus was a thing of the past. New, improved varieties with TSWV resistance along with other better management tools finally put the disease “to bed.” But tomato spotted wilt virus will not stay down.

Once a disease that threatened the peanut industry in the Southeast, tomato spotted wilt had been on the decline since 2005 and was nearly nonexistent in peanut fields between 2009 and 2012.

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Planting date and tillage practices impact thrips pressure in cotton

From Southeast Farm Press

Considering certain risk factors can give producers a heads-up when it comes to controlling thrips on cotton.

Several years ago, Georgia initiated a risk index for tomato spotted wilt in peanuts. It has evolved over time into Peanut Rx, a comprehensive disease management program, says Phillip Roberts, University of Georgia Extension entomologist.

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