University of Kentucky study combines outdoor exercise with tree health observations

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky researchers are looking for Lexingtonians interested in improving their health while gaining a greater awareness of their natural environment for a six-week research pilot project.

The project, titled “Healthy Trees-Healthy People,” gets participants out into two Lexington parks to walk and assess the health of selected trees. During the study, they will complete a daily log of their physical activity and tree health observations on designated trails at either Kirklevington Park or Harrods Hill Park. Depending on the park, routes are just under a half-mile and a mile. Continue reading

New forest health diagnostic resource available for Southeast

A new forest health diagnostic resource for county extension agents in the Southeast!  Dr. Jiri Hulcr (University of Florida) and Dr. Dave Coyle (Southern Regional Extension Forestry) have created the Southern Forest and Tree Health Diagnostics page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SouthernTreeHealthDiagnostics/

This group seeks to harness the collective knowledge of forest health experts throughout the Southeast to answer questions and make diagnoses from users who upload their tree health issues.  Submitting a question or issue is free and easy – users need only to upload a few cellphone pictures and give a short description of the issue.  Experts generally get back within 1-2 business days.

 

Where do you get your firewood?

The Southern Regional Extension Forestry program is conducting a survey about people’s awareness of forest and tree health issues. By answering a few questions about these issues, your firewood use habits, and where you’ve recently learned about the issues, program staff hopes to gain insight as to how to effectively engage with the public and how to improve in the future.

This survey should only take 10 minutes. The first page asks about your firewood purchasing practices. The second page asks about your knowledge of invasive forest insects. All answers will be kept completely confidential. Your participation is greatly appreciated.

Link to survey.

Study finds urban warming increases scale insect populations and reduces tree health

A study published this past March revealed that urban warming increases the abundance of some tree pests, while decreasing tree health.

North Carolina State University researchers Adam Dale and Steven Frank tested the hypothesis that warm temperatures stimulates the reproduction of herbivorous pests such as armored scale insects (Melanaspis tenebricosa), while also increasing water stress and decreasing tree health. They studied several populations of red maple (Acer rubrum) trees in the city of Raleigh, NC.

Continue reading