Spotted Lanternfly national pest alert published

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper, first discovered in the United States in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. Field observations indicate that the tree of heaven, Ailanthus altissima, is an important host plant; however the spotted lanternfly is known to feed on a wide range of hosts including wild and cultivated grapes, stone fruits, willow, and various hardwoods. This species is thought to be native to China, and has spread to other Asian countries. In 2004, it was first detected in Korea, where its populations expanded and it became an economically important pest of grapevines and fruit trees. In Korea, it damaged plants directly by phloem feeding, but also caused indirect damage due to mold that grew on honeydew excretions deposited on the leaves and fruits of host plants. It was recorded utilizing 67 host plant species in Korea, many of which also occur in the U.S. Given the wide range of hosts it feeds upon, the spotted lanternfly poses a serious economic threat to multiple U.S. industries, including viticulture, fruit trees, ornamentals and timber.

For the complete alert click on this link.

Tree of Heaven, paulownia are two tree species that provide refuge for brown marmorated stink bug after hibernation, study finds

Since its discovery in the United States in 1996, the brown marmorated stink bug has been testing the patience of farmers and homeowners alike. From spring to fall it decimates crops such as tree fruits, vegetables, cotton, corn and soybeans. After harvest it retreats to residential areas, covering buildings and vehicles, and often entering people’s homes.

The brown marmorated stink bug, or BMSB as it’s often called, was detected for the first time in Allentown, Pennsylvania in 1996. Over the next ten years, it spread to several states in the Northeast and began migrating south. By 2010 the pest was in North Carolina, and has since become a serious pest of fruit trees and vegetables. In some areas BMSB populations are so numerous that they are very difficult to control and inflict high levels of damage.

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Great weekend for planting, but learn what you’re getting

Often the plants that are the cheapest at the garden store are not always the easiest to maintain. According to the Wilmington Star, some residents in Wilmington are seeking an ordinance to prevent the planting of running bamboo, an attractive plant sold at garden stores. In the right conditions and not properly pruned, the plant can spill over into other yards, as a homeowner at Carolina Beach discovered after she returned from a long assignment out of town.

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Brown marmorated stink bugs continue southward movement

Brown marmorated stink bugs continue their gradual march to the south and seem to be enjoying the grain fields of northern Virginia.

Entomologists contend the southward movement is almost certain to continue.

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One Person’s Beautiful Plant; Another’s Invasive Nightmare

Although the distinctive sweet scents of honeysuckle and wisteria have always assured me that spring is on its way, by midsummer I find myself battling them in my backyard. While some people welcome these plants, and others with similar growth habits, neither of the plants is native to the United States, and in most cases, are considered invasive pests.

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