Tomato spotted wilt virus has not been put “to bed”

In Southeast Farm Press

by Bob Kemerait, University of Georgia

Peanut growers hoped tomato spotted wilt virus was a thing of the past. New, improved varieties with TSWV resistance along with other better management tools finally put the disease “to bed.” But tomato spotted wilt virus will not stay down.

Once a disease that threatened the peanut industry in the Southeast, tomato spotted wilt had been on the decline since 2005 and was nearly nonexistent in peanut fields between 2009 and 2012.

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UGA plant pathologist recommends planting peanuts in May to avoid TSWV

By Clint Thompson
University of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

A University of Georgia Extension plant pathologist is urging Georgia peanut farmers to plant a month later next year to keep the threat of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) at bay.

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Thrips pressure high but disease pressure low in Southern peanuts

From Southeast Farm Press

Many peanut growers in the Southeast saw early season conditions this year that mirrored those seen in 2013—a cool, wet spring and heavy thrips pressure.

It was reported at this year’s U.S.A. Peanut Congress that while the peanut crop finally got off to a good start in 2014 after early weather delays, thrips pressure was greater than normal and damage was reported in many locations.

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Planting date impacts peanut disease pressure

In Southeast Farm Press

A cooler, rain-soaked spring in parts of the Southeast pushed peanut planting dates later than usual, a factor that can impact the type and incidence of disease growers experience throughout the remainder of the season.

“Planting dates definitely make a difference in peanut diseases, both in the type of disease you have and the pressure,” says Austin Hagan, Auburn University Extension plant pathologist.

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Resistant varieties saved Georgia tomatoes from TSWV destruction

From Southeast Farm Press.

Once a major threat to the tomato industry, the thrips-vectored tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has been unable to penetrate the vegetable’s latest line of defense — resistant cultivars.

Scientists from the University of Georgia, University of Florida, Clemson and North Carolina State University have collaborated over the last two decades in an effort to try to alleviate what had become a deadly problem. The results have proven to be beneficial and profitable for tomato growers.

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