Citrus Disease Research and Extension (CDRE)

The Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) Citrus Disease Research and Extension Program (CDRE) is authorized in the Agricultural Act of 2014 (H.R. 2642) to award grants to eligible entities to conduct research and extension activities, technical assistance and development activities to: (a) combat citrus diseases and pests, both domestic and invasive and including huanglongbing and the Asian citrus psyllid, which pose imminent harm to United States citrus production and threaten the future viability of the citrus industry; and (b) provide support for the dissemination and commercialization of relevant information, techniques, and technologies discovered pursuant to research and extension activities funded through SCRI/CDRE and other research and extension projects targeting problems caused by citrus production diseases and invasive pests. Continue reading

Researchers Identify Herbicide Resistant Mechanism In Waterhemp

In the Missouri Ruralist

Responding to the first known report of waterhemp showing resistance to HPPD (4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase)-inhibiting herbicides, such as Callisto, Impact, and Laudis, weed science researchers at the University of Illinois have identified two unique mechanisms in the plant that have allowed the weed to “get around” these herbicides.

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Battelle study finds state Extension and Experiment Station services beneficial

An outside research company, Battelle Technology Partnership Practice and BioDimensions, has released a report detailing the impact of Extension and research programs in the Southern Region. The report, located at the LSU AgCenter website, highlights all of the various facets of Extension and research for agbioscience, including those not directly related to pest management. However, I wanted to highlight key findings in the report with regard to pest management specifically.

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Sonny Ramaswamy to speak at U of Kentucky land-grant commemoration

Current issues in land-grant research and recognition of award-winning researchers in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture will take center stage at the 2012 Celebration of Land-Grant Research.

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Funding Extension vital to research success

Reduction of funding for agricultural research and extension programs may give the appearance of saving taxpayer dollars, but the reduction in resources often means that sudden agricultural crises cost more. For instance, the entrance of soybean rust could have cost soybean growers millions of dollars in losses or wasted usage of fungicides had it not been for a quick, targeted outreach effort by extension plant pathologists. Apple growers in Kentucky would have faced possibly huge losses to codling moth because of OP insecticide cancellations if University of Kentucky extension specialists had not demonstrated a new IPM management program that is now increasing yields beyond those growers saw when they relied on the former insecticide. Yet those university extension resources are currently threatened with increasing federal and state funding cuts, according to a letter to the editor of Phytopathology journal.

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In the field, in the classroom or in the living room: University of Tennessee IPM Education

Transportation can often be a hindrance to education for adults. Residents in remote towns beyond city bus lines can’t travel when the car breaks down. High gas prices mean that car trips must be planned and limited to necessary errands. So when the University Extension Service offers a workshop on IPM, farmers must decide whether the trip to the workshop location is worth the extra money for gas. To relieve Tennessee soybean farmers of that decision, Extension specialists in the University of Tennessee IPM program bring the training to the farmer.

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