Keep pesticide drift at bay

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

As a result of two years of aggressive training to improve on-target agricultural pesticide applications, the number of pesticide drift complaints received by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has gone down 65 percent, according to UGA Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.

“No grower wants (their pesticides to) drift. I’ve said it a million times. The best way for Extension to help our growers eliminate drift is by providing them the latest research data on tactics and approaches they can implement to help them achieve their goal,” Culpepper said. Continue reading

Getting the Best of Pests – Green Webinar Series – March 15, 2017

The University of Georgia’s Center for Urban Agriculture has developed an online, live, interactive training program that allows individuals to obtain re-certification credits from virtually anywhere. You will need a computer with internet access and speakers.
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Warm winter temperatures spark fears of potential plant diseases

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait said that farmers rely on extreme cold and freezing temperatures during the winter for a break from one growing season to the next. Right now, that isn’t happening. Continue reading

UGA cotton research yields root-knot-nematode-resistant varieties

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

University of Georgia cotton breeder Peng Chee’s groundbreaking research in molecular genetics provides Georgia cotton farmers with root-knot-nematode-resistant cotton varieties. It also garnered Chee national recognition in January, when he was awarded the 2016 Cotton Genetics Research Award during the 2017 Beltwide Cotton Improvement Conference in Dallas.

Chee, a professor in UGA’s Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, identified nematode resistance as a top priority when he started working on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2000. Continue reading

Cowpea curculio a major pest this year of cowpeas

In Southeast Farm Press

by Merritt Melancon, Southeast Farm Press

The lucky legume has been part of a boom-and-bust cycle for the past three decades thanks to a pod-feeding weevil that has, so far, evaded farmers’ best pest control practices.

This year is going to be a bust due to high pest pressure, said David Riley, a professor of entomology at the University of Georgia who works with vegetable pests. Continue reading

Deer are beautiful, but not when they dine on your landscape plants

by Tim Daly, University of Georgia

My backyard was home to several large hostas. These plants prefer shady sites, and they were thriving where I had them planted. Then, one day, they simply disappeared.

All that was left were a few small branches sticking out of the ground. Something had eaten my hostas and the most probable culprits were deer. They tend to cause more problems for homeowners than most other types of wildlife. Continue reading

Georgia researchers find soybeans resistant to kudzu bug

In Southeast Farm Press

by Merritt Melancon, Southeast Farm Press

Kudzu bugs are not native to Georgia, but in the past seven years, they’ve made their homes in soybean fields across the southeastern U.S.

While they don’t cause damage every soybean season, they can cause yield losses of between 20 and 60 percent. That can create a big loss for farmers who tend the approximately 80 million acres of soybeans grown in the U.S. each year. Continue reading