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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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University of Georgia students and faculty discuss GMOs

By Sadie Lackey, University of Georgia

To help spark a more substantive conversation about genetically modified crops, the Sustainable Food Systems Initiative hosted a panel discussion on Sept. 26 after the public film screening of “Food Evolution,” a 2016 documentary on the issues surrounding GMOs and their promise for building a more food-secure world. The Sustainable Food Systems Initiative is a faculty group from across the University of Georgia campus that focuses on inter-disciplinary solutions to food system problems. Faculty from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) led this initiative.

The panel included UGA agricultural communications professor Abigail Borron, Wayne Parrott of the UGA Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, Pablo Lapegna, UGA sociology professor and author of Soybeans and Power: Genetically Modified Crops, Environmental Politics and Social Movements in Argentina and UGA CAES sustainable agriculture coordinator Julia Gaskin. Continue reading

UGA workshop set for Aug. 23 will cover integrated pest management for schools

By Cristina deRevere for CAES News

Georgia has strict regulations and rules when it comes to managing pests at schools. The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) offers a biannual workshop on integrated pest management (IPM) for pest control operators who have school contracts in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee. The program will host the fall 2018 School IPM Workshop on Thursday, Aug. 23.

Registration is open until Wednesday, Aug. 22 for the workshop that begins at 9 a.m. at the Student Learning Center on the UGA Griffin campus. The workshop ends at 3 p.m. Continue reading

UGA CAES team researching whiteflies statewide

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Silverleaf whiteflies devastated Georgia’s cotton and fall vegetable crops last year. In response to this crisis, a team of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences research and UGA Cooperative Extension specialists is studying the pests statewide to help cotton and vegetable farmers avoid another year of disappointing crops.

“Teams are an important part of UGA. Many of the issues agriculturists face today require a collection of scientists from differing disciplines with differing expertise to address complex issues. The silverleaf whitefly fits the bill here,” said Phillip Roberts, UGA Extension cotton and soybean entomologist and Whitefly Team member. “Not only are whiteflies a direct pest of plants as a result of feeding, but they also transmit several viruses to vegetables that can have a devastating effect on virus-susceptible crops.” Continue reading

Pepper weevil is the new big threat to vegetables

In Southeast Farm Press

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Pepper weevils are such a threat to Georgia’s pepper crop that University of Georgia vegetable entomologist David Riley says Georgia farmers and agricultural workers should immediately kill any weevils found on fruit, equipment or clothes.

This year’s cold winter temperatures helped to wipe out fall vegetable plants like peppers and eggplants that host the weevils. However, weevils can hitchhike on peppers that the U.S. imports from Mexico and infect Georgia’s pepper fields. Seventy percent of the winter peppers imported into the U.S. are grown in Mexico, where pepper weevils originate. Continue reading

Scouting for insects is still important in a home vegetable garden

By Becky Griffin, University of Georgia

Whether you work on a large family farm, in a home vegetable garden, or in a small, community garden vegetable plot, routinely scouting for insects should be an important part of your vegetable-growing plan.

Insect pests can be a costly problem in vegetables. The life cycles of some insect pests are so short that missing just one week of scouting can lead to an increase in pests and damaged crops. Continue reading

UGA research aimed at stopping gummy stem blight in the greenhouse

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Georgia watermelon growers who have a targeted, informed disease management plan for gummy stem blight disease could save money and lessen the environmental impact of producing this favorite summertime fruit.

University of Georgia horticulturist Cecilia McGregor, along with fellow UGA scientists Marin Brewer and Bhabesh Dutta, studies the impact of reduced fungicide use through early detection of gummy stem blight in watermelons. Continue reading

Trying to tame fire ants? Consider whether you want to eliminate the mounds or the ants

By Sharon Dowdy, University of Georgia

Fire ant research is not a hot topic in the scientific community because effective control products are available, but fire ants can kill people, so management of this pest remains an ongoing issue, according to Will Hudson, University of Georgia entomology professor.

“It’s a measure of the state of entomology. We used to have a fair amount of fire ant research going on in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,” said Hudson, who has studied the control of turf insects for the past 30 years. “But fire ants are still important because other ants aren’t going to kill you. If you are allergic and you get stung by a whole lot of fire ants, you could die.” Continue reading