7 horticulture jobs available

Seven new jobs in horticultural science are now available:

Extension Educator, Floriculture and Greenhouse Crops, Michigan State University
As part of Michigan State University Extension and the Agriculture & Agribusiness Institute, the Floriculture/Greenhouse Extension Educator will have statewide Extension programming responsibilities focused on floriculture and greenhouse crop production and pest management. Michigan, a national leader in greenhouse-grown plant material, ranks third among U.S. states in floriculture crop production. This position, based in Kalamazoo County, is in the heart of the greenhouse plant production in southwest Michigan. (See more) Continue reading

Despite potential for disease, Georgia’s grape industry is thriving

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Georgia’s grape industry, once dormant, is now thriving, according to Phillip Brannen, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit plant pathologist. Growing potential for prosperity in the wine industry will require that farmers stay vigilant about certain diseases, like Pierce’s disease, that could negatively impact production.

“Pierce’s disease is the major disease to limit European grapes in Georgia. It is caused by a bacterium that is transmitted by numerous sharpshooter insects, such as the glassy-winged sharpshooter. It clogs the grape xylem, cutting off nutrient and water flow,” Brannen said. Continue reading

Keep pesticide drift at bay

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

As a result of two years of aggressive training to improve on-target agricultural pesticide applications, the number of pesticide drift complaints received by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has gone down 65 percent, according to UGA Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.

“No grower wants (their pesticides to) drift. I’ve said it a million times. The best way for Extension to help our growers eliminate drift is by providing them the latest research data on tactics and approaches they can implement to help them achieve their goal,” Culpepper said. Continue reading

Getting the Best of Pests – Green Webinar Series – March 15, 2017

The University of Georgia’s Center for Urban Agriculture has developed an online, live, interactive training program that allows individuals to obtain re-certification credits from virtually anywhere. You will need a computer with internet access and speakers.
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Warm winter temperatures spark fears of potential plant diseases

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait said that farmers rely on extreme cold and freezing temperatures during the winter for a break from one growing season to the next. Right now, that isn’t happening. Continue reading

UGA cotton research yields root-knot-nematode-resistant varieties

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

University of Georgia cotton breeder Peng Chee’s groundbreaking research in molecular genetics provides Georgia cotton farmers with root-knot-nematode-resistant cotton varieties. It also garnered Chee national recognition in January, when he was awarded the 2016 Cotton Genetics Research Award during the 2017 Beltwide Cotton Improvement Conference in Dallas.

Chee, a professor in UGA’s Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, identified nematode resistance as a top priority when he started working on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2000. Continue reading

Cowpea curculio a major pest this year of cowpeas

In Southeast Farm Press

by Merritt Melancon, Southeast Farm Press

The lucky legume has been part of a boom-and-bust cycle for the past three decades thanks to a pod-feeding weevil that has, so far, evaded farmers’ best pest control practices.

This year is going to be a bust due to high pest pressure, said David Riley, a professor of entomology at the University of Georgia who works with vegetable pests. Continue reading