Students, teachers and community gardeners launch pollinator census this August

By Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

Calling the class roll is a time-tested way for teachers to start the school year, but when Georgia students head back to school this year, some of them will complete a roll call of their own.

Honeybees? Present. Leafcutter bees? Here. Swallowtail butterflies? Yo. Continue reading

UGA’s new fruit pathologist to focus on disease management of perennial fruit crops

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Jonathan Oliver’s study of blueberries and his homegrown knowledge of citrus makes the Palatka, Florida, native a valuable addition to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Stationed on the UGA Tifton campus, Oliver recently joined the college as a fruit pathologist specializing in blueberries, blackberries, citrus, pomegranates, olives and mayhaws. Continue reading

How to maintain a thirsty lawn

The following recommendations were developed by Extension specialists at the University of Georgia. However, they are general enough to be relevant to every state on the East coast that is affected by the drought this summer. Click here for the original article, written by Mary Carol Sheffield.

Water correctly. In the absence of rainfall, established lawns need about 1 inch of water a week. Because the soil cannot absorb that much water at one time, which results in runoff, smaller volumes of water totaling 1 inch may need to be applied at separate times during the week. For example, two half-inch applications could be made three to four days apart. Continue reading

UGA’s annual Organic Farm Twilight Tour slated for June 29

By Merritt Melancon

In its sixth year, UGA’s Organic Farm Twilight Tour is a chance to stroll around UGA’s 90-acre organic research and horticulture farm and learn about the latest in organic growing methods.

The tour will run from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, June 29, 2017, at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Durham Horticulture Farm at 1221 Hog Mountain Road in Watkinsville, Georgia. Continue reading

Kudzu bugs’ decline is attributed to two factors

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Once a devastating presence in Georgia’s soybean fields and a major nuisance to homeowners, the kudzu bug population has diminished over the past three years.

“Having kudzu bugs in your field isn’t the end of the world. It becomes problematic when you have too many of them,” said Ian Knight, a University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences graduate student. Continue reading

Getting the Best of Pests Green Webinar Series – May 17

The University of Georgia’s Center for Urban Agriculture has developed an online, live, interactive training program that allows individuals to obtain Continuing Education credits from virtually anywhere. The Georgia Department of Agriculture does not limit the number of hours that can be acquired by webinar! All you will need is a computer with internet access and speakers.

TOPICS and SPEAKERS: Bermudagrass Stem maggot in Georgia Hay Fields, Dr. Will Hudson, University of Georgia, Athens; Biology and Management of Spotted Wing Drosophila, Dr. Ash Sial, University of Georgia, Athens Continue reading

7 horticulture jobs available

Seven new jobs in horticultural science are now available:

Extension Educator, Floriculture and Greenhouse Crops, Michigan State University
As part of Michigan State University Extension and the Agriculture & Agribusiness Institute, the Floriculture/Greenhouse Extension Educator will have statewide Extension programming responsibilities focused on floriculture and greenhouse crop production and pest management. Michigan, a national leader in greenhouse-grown plant material, ranks third among U.S. states in floriculture crop production. This position, based in Kalamazoo County, is in the heart of the greenhouse plant production in southwest Michigan. (See more) Continue reading