Assistant Professor, Apiculturist (12-month, tenure-track, 100% Extension)

The successful applicant will develop and deliver a vibrant Extension Apiculture educational program with a supporting applied-research component designed to resolve problems of importance to the beekeeping industry in Tennessee. This individual will provide leadership in Extension and outreach education that meets the needs of clientele regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, religion or veteran status. Continue reading

UTIA research finds cover crops benefit no-till cotton systems

by Doug Edlund, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture

It isn’t often that researchers have the luxury to examine data from a long-term research project. While most research projects last from three to five years, scientists with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture recently published a study that covered a 29-year period to find the benefits of cover crops on no-till cotton fields.

After harvesting cotton there is very little residual biomass. Without a crop covering the ground, there is an increased amount of soil exposure that can lead to erosion from winter rains and runoff. Continue reading

Target Spot in Cotton – How to identify it and management options

by Heather Marie Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

As cotton gets closer to blooming, scouts should be on the lookout for target spot and defoliation starting in the lower canopy.

The warm, wet weather the Mid-South has been experiencing could promote target spot in cotton fields, especially those fields that saw the disease in 2016 and are irrigated. Additional factors that increase target spot risk include higher planting rates, excessive N rates, narrow row spacing, vigorous growth, as well as hot, humid weather. Some facts about target spot: Continue reading

Research by Friends of IPM graduate student winner helps Tennessee ranchers with tick scouting

Cattle owners in western Tennessee need to be vigilant for four species of cattle tick, while cattle owners in eastern Tennessee need to watch for only two species. Why? That’s what research done by a Masters student at the University of Tennessee aims to address.

Masters student David Theuret, who won one of this year’s Friends of Southern IPM graduate student awards, focused on ticks infesting cattle during his graduate program. To assist cattle producers with scouting, Theuret first sampled ticks in Tennessee to determine which species were present and what times of year producers would need to watch for them. Continue reading

Spotting and managing target spot

To hear first-hand from an expert about how to manage target spot and some results of research to help, tune in next Monday afternoon at 3 PM for Dr. Austin Hagan’s webinar on target spot. Click here to register.

From an article by Tyson Raper, University of Tennessee, in Cotton Grower

As the cotton specialist for the state of Tennessee, I am constantly on the lookout for potential issues that may impact Mid-South cotton production. Over the past several years, I have occasionally observed several “target spots,” or Corynespora leaf spots, on the lower leaves of rank cotton plants. Although the number of spots and number of affected leaves are typically low, many growers have asked if the disease might be able to cause the 200-400/lb lint per acre yield penalties reported along the Gulf coast. Continue reading

Assistant Professor, Extension Specialty Crops Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

Position: 12-month tenure-track, Assistant Professor (100% Extension) of Entomology and Plant Pathology, with particular emphasis on pathogens of non-ornamental specialty crops

Location: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, Knoxville, Tennessee

Duties and responsibilities: The recruited individual is expected to develop and deliver a vibrant, nationally recognized innovative applied research and Extension education program focused on diseases of one or more important or emerging crops of Tennessee (e.g., fruits, vegetables, tobacco, hemp). The individual will provide technical expertise on disease management, will develop an educational program using traditional and innovative outreach tools for diverse audiences (e.g., Extension agents and specialists, producers, regional and state leaders, Master Gardeners) and will provide leadership in developing a specialty crop Extension and outreach program that meets the needs of all eligible clientele regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, religion or veteran status. The candidate also is expected to participate in the training of M.S. and Ph.D. students and to provide service to the department, university, and professional societies or organizations. Continue reading

Target spot and boll drop – the knowns and unknowns

Authored by Heather M. Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist and Tyson Raper, Cotton and Small Grains Specialist, University of Tennessee

This is a repost from the UT Crops News blog. Since it has general information, I thought I would include it in our regional blog. Continue reading