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Gypsy Moth Biology, Ecology, Management, and Implications for the Southeastern U.S.

The Southern Regional Extension Forestry Forest Health and Invasive Species Program is pleased to present the 3rd webinar of spring 2015:  “Gypsy Moth Biology, Ecology, and Management and Implications for the Southeastern U.S.”  This webinar will be at 1 pm EST on March 23, and will be presented by world-renowned gypsy moth expert Dr. Sandy Liebhold of the USDA Forest Service.  The webinar is eligible for SAF and ISA CEUs, and can be accessed here:  http://www.forestrywebinars.net/webinars/gypsy-moth-biology-ecology-and-management-and-implications-for-the-southeastern-u.s.  Please contact Dave Coyle (dcoyle@sref.info) with any questions. Continue reading

Tiny bug offers ray of hope for hemlocks

From the Roanoke Times

On Friday a Virginia Tech research team working to stop destruction of Appalachia’s iconic hemlock trees unleashed a new microscopic weapon in the fight against the tree-killing woolly adelgid.

Tech entomology professor Scott Salom and graduate student Katlin Mooneyham seeded infested hemlocks on private property near Mountain Lake in Giles County with about 1,000 laboratory-grown eggs of the Laricobius osakensis, a newly discovered beetle species from Osaka, Japan, that preys almost exclusively on the woolly adelgid.

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Emerald ash borer now in Great Smoky Mountains

The first backcountry emerald ash borer infestation has been confirmed in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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