Seminar on Best practices for National Institute of Food and Agriculture funding success: A 25 year perspective

From the Connection, North Central IPM Center

Although this seminar is targeted for nutritionists, anyone with an interest in pursuing USDA funding will glean information from Dr. Jaykus’s experience.

Dr. Lee-Ann Jaykus, North Carolina State University, will present “Best practices for National Institute of Food and Agriculture funding success: A twenty year perspective” from 3-4 p.m. Eastern on Feb.23, 2017. The seminar can be viewed via Adobe Connect as well as in Room 3310 of the Waterfront Building, Washington, DC. This seminar has been approved by the Commission on Dietetic Registration for 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Unit (CEU).*

This seminar is part of the Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition (IFSN) Seminar Series. These monthly seminars aim to disseminate new knowledge; engage with partners and stakeholders; and inspire the next generation of food safety and nutrition experts. For full information on the series, visit the seminar webpage. Continue reading

USDA Announces $10.7 Million for Critical Water Research

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced the availability of $10.7 million in funding for research that could solve critical water problems in rural and agricultural watersheds across the United States. This funding is available through the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill and administered by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

“Finding solutions for dealing with water scarcity as well as maintaining water quality is critical for communities across the country and for the men and women who raise the food we eat,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “Better water management practices, tools and technologies will make a difference for farmers, ranchers, and foresters who are constantly adapting to less predictable and more severe weather patterns.” Continue reading

Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announces $130 Million Available for Foundational Agricultural Research, Education and Extension

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that $130 million in funding is available for research, education, and extension projects to support sustainable, productive and economically viable plant and animal production systems, including certified organic production. This funding is available through the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) Foundational Program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill and administered by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

“Investing in agricultural research ensures that our farmers and ranchers have innovative, safe and sustainable management practices to meet the food needs of the rising world population,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “In addition, studies have shown that every dollar invested in agricultural research now returns over $20 to our economy.” Continue reading

NIFA’s BRAG, ORG, and SCRI RFAs Released

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture is pleased to announce the release of the following Requests for Applications:  Continue reading

Funding opportunities from USDA

Below is a link to an updated and comprehensive guide to federal funding programs in areas related to Sustainable Agriculture, Forestry, Entrepreneurship, Conservation, Food Systems, and Community Development.

The guide can help with navigating the enormous array of federal programs and resources that are available. This edition constitutes the guide’s sixth printing and fourth complete update, incorporating programs from the 2014 Farm Bill. A pdf copy can be downloaded for free, and a hard copy is available for a small handling fee.

http://www.sare.org/Learning-Center/Books/Building-Sustainable-Farms-Ranches-and-Communities

Funding Extension vital to research success

Reduction of funding for agricultural research and extension programs may give the appearance of saving taxpayer dollars, but the reduction in resources often means that sudden agricultural crises cost more. For instance, the entrance of soybean rust could have cost soybean growers millions of dollars in losses or wasted usage of fungicides had it not been for a quick, targeted outreach effort by extension plant pathologists. Apple growers in Kentucky would have faced possibly huge losses to codling moth because of OP insecticide cancellations if University of Kentucky extension specialists had not demonstrated a new IPM management program that is now increasing yields beyond those growers saw when they relied on the former insecticide. Yet those university extension resources are currently threatened with increasing federal and state funding cuts, according to a letter to the editor of Phytopathology journal.

Continue reading