IPM Enhancement Grant projects examine agricultural, urban issues

The Southern IPM Center will spend $309,653 to address agricultural and urban issues during the next year with its IPM Enhancement Grant. Out of 32 proposals submitted to the program, a review panel outside of the region selected 11 for funding.

IPM Enhancement Grants are relatively small grants (up to $30,000 for most) to address an integrated pest management issue. Most publicly funded organizations are eligible to apply as long as they reside in one of the 13 states or territories covered by the Southern IPM Center. Continue reading

Varroa Mite IPM Videos Available

The Honey Bee Health Coalition released a series of videos today to help beekeepers promote colony health and combat costly and destructive Varroa mite (Varroa destructor) infestations. The videos can be found on the Coalition website at honeybeehealthcoalition.org/Varroa and provide detailed step-by-step instructions on how to monitor hives for Varroa and safely treat when levels get too high. The videos complement the Coalition’s wildly popular Tools for Varroa Management Guide.

“The Honey Bee Health Coalition’s Tools for Varroa Management Guide has provided beekeepers in the US and Canada with invaluable tools and techniques to confront destructive Varroa mite infestations,” said Mark Dykes, Apiary Inspectors of America. “These videos will show beekeeper real world application techniques that will help them correctly apply treatments.”

Click here to watch the videos. Continue reading

ARS researchers find that honey bees may carry Varroa mites into other hives

In ARS news

By Jan Suszkiw, USDA Agricultural Research Service

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are hot on the trail of a honey bee killer, and their detective work has taken them from hives in Tucson, Arizona, to those in Bismarck, North Dakota.

Led by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) supervisory research entomologist Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman, the team is staking out the entrances of victimized hives, eyeing the comings and goings of foraging honey bees that they suspect may be unwitting accomplices. Continue reading

Mushrooms may provide key to saving honey bees

In Southwest Farm Press

Years of research and millions of dollars have been spent in an attempt to discover the cause and remedy for an unsettling phenomenon known as honeybee colony collapse disorder, a condition that researchers now believe is the result of at least 60 environmental factors that are threatening honeybee populations worldwide.

In the United States alone, commercial honeybees have teetered on the brink of destruction for years, an estimated one-third of all bee colonies dying each year since the middle of the last decade. In all, these commercial bees are responsible for pollinating over $15 billion worth of crops in the U.S. annually.

Continue reading

EPA Registers New Miticide to Combat Varroa Mites in Bees

EPA is registering a new miticide, oxalic acid, to combat the devastating effects of the Varroa mite on honey bee colonies. Oxalic acid is currently registered for this use in Canada and Europe. Recognizing beekeepers’ need for additional registered tools to combat the Varroa mite in U.S. honey bee colonies, the EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Agricultureon the registration.

Continue reading

Bee health research advanced by discovery of parasite-free colony

From Farm Futures

An international team of researchers has discovered honey bee colonies in Newfoundland, Canada, that are free of the invasive parasites – like the Varroa mite – that affect honey bees elsewhere in the world.

The populations allow the researchers to investigate honey bee health, both with and without interfering interactions from parasites.

Continue reading

Pollinator issues subject of presentation at Beltwide

In Delta Farm Press

Declines in honey bee populations continue to attract attention in the national media and in environmental activist circles. Activists and some beekeepers have been asking that pesticide registrations be withdrawn because of claims the chemicals are impacting bees negatively.

Continue reading