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Southeastern Crop Handbook 2019 Released

Hot off the press from American Vegetable Grower and in its twentieth iteration, the latest version of the Crop Handbook is now available for download.  This comes as a result of collaboration between researchers and specialists from 12 land-grant institutions across the United States.

To download a copy of the PDF, click here.

 

Soil health is the key to good spinach plants

in Morning Ag Clips

Soils keep plants healthy by providing plants with water, helpful minerals, and microbes, among other benefits. But what if the soil also contains toxic elements?

In areas like Salinas Valley, California, the soils are naturally rich in the element cadmium. Leafy vegetables grown in these soils can take up the cadmium and become harmful to humans. What to do? The solution goes back to the soil. Adrian Paul, a former researcher now working in the Sustainable Mineral Institute in Brisbane, Australia, is working to find which soil additives work best. Continue reading

Intercropping boosts vegetable production

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

The old ways could be the best ways when it comes to small-acreage vegetable production, according to a newly published article available through the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

Dr. Jose Franco, a U.S. Department of Agriculture Agriculture Research Service agroecologist, Mandan, North Dakota, conducted the two-year study of intercropping at the Texas A&M University Horticulture Farm in Bryan for his doctoral dissertation under the guidance of Dr. Astrid Volder, former Texas A&M University faculty and current University of California at Davis plant physiologist; Dr. Stephen King, a former professor and vegetable breeder with Texas A&M department of horticultural sciences, College Station; and Dr. Joe Masabni, AgriLife Extension small acreage horticulturist, Overton.  Continue reading

East Texas Fruit and Vegetable Conference to offer tips, tricks for amateur and expert growers

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

The inaugural East Texas Fruit and Vegetable Conference will offer professional and amateur producers tips on everything from wildlife management to vegetable and fruit production and marketing.

The event will be Aug. 19 at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, 1710 Farm-to-Market Road 3053 in Overton. There is a $30 fee for individuals and $50 for couples. The deadline to register is Aug. 1. There is an additional $5 charge for late registration. Continue reading

Cover Crops for Soil Health and Weed Control in No-Till Vegetable Production

Preventing weeds from competing with crops without degrading soil quality remains a major challenge in sustainable crop production.   No-till vegetable production can offer a more sustainable approach to weed management than the frequent use of herbicides and tillage. This is especially true for organic farmers, who are not permitted to use synthetic herbicides and therefore must rely on frequent cultivation and tillage for weed control.  Tillage and herbicides do help control weeds however they often have negative impacts on soil health. In this half-day training we will demonstrate on-going organic no-till field research at Clemson’s Coastal Research & Education Center Farm and learn about cover crop selection for use in no-till systems.

When: April 20th 2016, 9AM – 12PM 

Where: Coastal Research and Education Center Experiment Station, 2865 Savannah Hwy, Charleston, SC

Continue reading

Save the dates for insect, disease and weed management workshops in SC

Save the dates for these upcoming workshops for vegetable production brought to you by the Clemson University Sustainable Agriculture Program and its partners, Carolina Farm Stewardship Association and Clemson University Extension Program. Continue reading

Georgia vegetable growers manage without methyl bromide

From Southeast Farm Press

For decades, Georgia vegetable farmers relied on the soil fumigant methyl bromide to control weeds, insects and nematodes, but recent changes in environmental regulations have led them to find replacements.

Stanley Culpepper, a weed scientist with the College of Agricultural of Environmental Sciences, has been working to find alternatives to the potentially ozone-damaging pesticide. The challenge has been finding something that is as easy to use and as effective as farmers’ old standby, methyl bromide.

Continue reading