Weeds: Nature’s Graffiti – How IPM Can Fix That

Weeds of concern and their control varies widely by state. The attitudes of school districts toward weeds also differ depending on whether the weeds are in the recess yard or athletic field. How do school facility managers or contracted turf management firms contend with weeds?

Learn how to observe your school grounds with an eye toward identifying weeds and their locations. This webinar, sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, will provide you with Integrated Pest Management (IPM) based control tactics for common weeds. IPM is an approach that uses a hierarchy of practices, including exclusion, sanitation, biological, and mechanical methods, to reduce unnecessary pesticide exposure while providing sustainable pest control. Continue reading

Clemson students studying ways to improve value of cover crops

In Southeast Farm Press

by Denise Attaway

A group of Clemson students is determining how to use shredded leaves to help increase the value of roller-crimped cover crops.

Cover crops are crops planted primarily to naturally manage soil erosion, soil fertility, soil and water quality, weeds, pests, diseases, biodiversity and wildlife. Roller-crimping involves attaching roller-crimpers to tractors, rolling over cover crops to flatten and damage them, leaving behind a thick mulch. Rye grass is the cover crop used in this study. Continue reading

What do farmers think about resistant weeds?

in Southeast Farm Press

Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. However, there have been few organized opportunities for farmers to make their voices heard and to share their experiences in managing herbicide-resistant weeds.

This is changing with a series of seven regional listening sessions sponsored by the Weed Science Society of America, the United Soybean Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Farmers across the nation are being invited to share their challenges, successes and opinions. Continue reading

Cover crops can be beneficial with informed decisions

In Southwest Farm Press

A cover crop used in conjunction with a conservation tillage system may help conserve soil and improve soil health, fertility, water quality, weed/disease/pest control, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat.

But it requires “educated management decisions,” says Paul DeLaune, Texas AgriLife Research agronomist at Vernon, Texas. He discussed ongoing cover crop research on the Texas Rolling Plains during the Red River Crops Conference. Continue reading

New Agronomic Crops Webinars Available from Alabama Cooperative Extension

New webinars are available from the Alabama Cooperative Extension System  – Agronomic Crops Team. Please visit the links below to watch the recorded presentations: Continue reading

Protect trees when applying herbicides to weeds

by Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

It can take years for a tree to reach full maturity, but it only takes one or two seasons of damage to irreparably harm the biggest and most expensive piece of a well-designed landscape.

Drought, insects and blight can all cause damage to mature trees. But more often than not, when a mature tree takes a turn for the worse, the culprit may be human error. Continue reading

Diversity is necessary in weed control

in Southwest Farm Press

South Texas, or coastal Texas, is a unique region of the greater Southwest, marked by a sub-tropical climate, unique soils and a host of both advantages and disadvantages when it comes to agriculture.

The warmer climate allows for an extended growing season, and its relationship with the tropical Gulf of Mexico offers some clear advantages, like seasonal rains, but also unique challenges, not the least of which is an environment conducive to the rapid growth and propagation of noxious and damaging weed varieties. Continue reading