A Tale of Two Buttercups

by Matt Poore, North Carolina State University

One of the signs of spring are the beautiful buttercups that adorn the roadsides, pastures and cropland. While to the casual viewer they really give a pretty yellow glow to the world in early spring, to an experienced forage manager they are clearly one of our most common and troublesome weeds.

Buttercups are non-native species that are very opportunistic at taking hold wherever there is bare ground in pastures. They are very common in hay feeding/sacrifice areas, around waterers, and everywhere in pastures that have been damaged due to animal impact during wet times, or due to overgrazing. The plants are very quick to set seed, so by the time you see the first yellow, there are literally only days left until they have set seed to provide for a good population the next year. So, if your pastures are really yellow each spring and you don’t do anything about it, it is unlikely that you will ever have much of a break from their impact. Continue reading

Cover Crops Work? See them working in pictures

All across the United States, farmers are increasingly using cover crops to suppress weeds, conserve soil and control pests and diseases. But agricultural educators know that savvy farmers are reluctant about risk and often want to see cover crops in action before making significant change. SARE’s Library of Cover Crop and Soil Health Images is now available to help educators show producers how cover crops can work on their farms.

The collection includes over 1,500 photos and illustrations organized into 10 galleries. A soil health gallery features high-resolution illustrations compiled in a set of 20 PowerPoint slides for use in presentations.  Continue reading

APHIS Releases New Weed Risk Assessments

APHIS’ Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) has posted Weed Risk Assessments (WRA) for the following seven weed species:

Continue reading

APHIS Releases New Weed Risk Assessment

APHIS’ Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) has posted Weed Risk Assessments (WRA) for the following seven weed species:

Continue reading

Southern IPM Coordinators release their pest management priorities for 2017

IPM Coordinators in the Southern Region updated a list of the major insect pest, disease and weed issues that researchers and extension specialists should try to address in the coming year. During their annual meeting on March 15 at the Southeastern Branch Entomological Society of America meeting, IPM Coordinators reviewed the current Southern Region priorities while sharing some of the challenges in their state.

The coordinators belong to a regional committee called the Southern Extension and Research Activities (SERA) 003. Each major region of the country—south, northeast, north central and west—has a similar regional committee. Continue reading

Weeds: Nature’s Graffiti – How IPM Can Fix That

Weeds of concern and their control varies widely by state. The attitudes of school districts toward weeds also differ depending on whether the weeds are in the recess yard or athletic field. How do school facility managers or contracted turf management firms contend with weeds?

Learn how to observe your school grounds with an eye toward identifying weeds and their locations. This webinar, sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, will provide you with Integrated Pest Management (IPM) based control tactics for common weeds. IPM is an approach that uses a hierarchy of practices, including exclusion, sanitation, biological, and mechanical methods, to reduce unnecessary pesticide exposure while providing sustainable pest control. Continue reading

Clemson students studying ways to improve value of cover crops

In Southeast Farm Press

by Denise Attaway

A group of Clemson students is determining how to use shredded leaves to help increase the value of roller-crimped cover crops.

Cover crops are crops planted primarily to naturally manage soil erosion, soil fertility, soil and water quality, weeds, pests, diseases, biodiversity and wildlife. Roller-crimping involves attaching roller-crimpers to tractors, rolling over cover crops to flatten and damage them, leaving behind a thick mulch. Rye grass is the cover crop used in this study. Continue reading