Floating rig battles invasive lake vegetation

In StarNews Online

by Terry Reilly

The lakes at Boiling Spring Lakes are not bubbling with scalding water. Instead of steam rising, the tentacles of invasive vegetation protrude from the city’s three main lakes.

The city launched a partial attack last year but retreated due to a lack of funds. Continue reading

Weeds could develop resistance to dicamba in three generations

In Delta Farm Press

What happens if farmers follow the same practices they have when other new herbicide chemistries have come on the market over the last several decades?

If they’re not careful, they will simply replace one herbicide with another, as they did with Prowl and Treflan, ALS herbicides, glyphosate and most recently with PPO inhibitors such as Flextar and Reflex. Continue reading

If your weed control is working, it’s time to change it, says weed scientist

in Delta Farm Press

It might seem like an odd recommendation to make – to change something if it’s working.

But that’s what Bob Scott, Extension weed scientist with the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said during a presentation at Pigposium 3, held at East Arkansas Community College in Forrest City. Continue reading

Northeastern IPM Center presents “The IPM Toolbox” Spring Webinar Series

Got an IPM question? Need to know the latest IPM information? The Northeastern IPM Center has got the answers with their spring webinar series, “The IPM Toolbox.” They’ve asked the experts to join us online for an hour of dialogue about an effective IPM practice, method, or effort.

We have three webinars scheduled this month… Continue reading

Manage pigweed early for best results

In Southwest Farm Press

by Muthu Bagavathiannan, Josh McGinty, Vijay Singh, Peter Dotray , Texas A&M AgriLife

Palmer amaranth and waterhemp are two pigweed species that have become problematic in row crop production fields in Texas. Palmer amaranth is widespread in the High Plains, Rio Grande Valley, Coastal Bend and Central Texas regions, whereas waterhemp is predominantly found in the Upper Gulf Coast as well as the Blacklands regions.

Herbicide resistance in these two species is an emerging issue and Extension specialists have emphasized the need for diversifying weed management tactics to prevent or delay resistance. Because pigweeds produce enormous amounts of seeds, preventing seed production from the escapes is a critical component of sustainable resistance management. Research has shown that a single Palmer pigweed plant can produce in excess of 1.5 million seeds under good growing conditions. Continue reading

Saving Costs with Cover Crops

In ARS News

Cotton farmers in Alabama who use cover crops have a new, cost-cutting option. They can kill their cover crops and plant their cotton in the same pass through a field, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

Cover crops are gaining in popularity because they suppress weeds and help retain moisture and nutrients. Farmers typically plant cover crops in the fall and kill them in the spring by flattening them with a roller, spraying them with herbicides, or both. After killing the cover crop, growers plant a cash crop in the same field. That usually requires two passes of a tractor: one to kill the cover crop and another a few weeks later to plant the cash crop. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Buttercups

by Matt Poore, North Carolina State University

One of the signs of spring are the beautiful buttercups that adorn the roadsides, pastures and cropland. While to the casual viewer they really give a pretty yellow glow to the world in early spring, to an experienced forage manager they are clearly one of our most common and troublesome weeds.

Buttercups are non-native species that are very opportunistic at taking hold wherever there is bare ground in pastures. They are very common in hay feeding/sacrifice areas, around waterers, and everywhere in pastures that have been damaged due to animal impact during wet times, or due to overgrazing. The plants are very quick to set seed, so by the time you see the first yellow, there are literally only days left until they have set seed to provide for a good population the next year. So, if your pastures are really yellow each spring and you don’t do anything about it, it is unlikely that you will ever have much of a break from their impact. Continue reading