More mature cover crops help maintain residue longer

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Often producers planting cover crops are worried about moisture use, but more important is the longevity of the crop residue and its beneficial results, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist.

Dr. Paul DeLaune, an AgriLife Research environmental soil scientist at Vernon, said when he talks about the residue management of cover crops, one question he always gets concerns termination timing and the use of soil moisture by the cover crop. Continue reading

Miracle weed killer is devastating farms

In the Washington Post

EDITOR’s NOTE: One of the primary purposes of integrated pest management is to prevent pesticide resistance. Unfortunately, as Northeastern IPM Center Director Steve Young says, “the trend in industry, regulatory, policy, and even academia over the past several decades has been a focus on technology aimed at simplifying production practices,” resulting in “fewer and fewer options.” The looming controversy over dicamba use is a prime example. I’ve been reading articles in Delta and Southeast Farm Press over the past several months that show that use of the most recent release of dicamba has torn the agricultural community apart, pitting neighbor against neighbor. Some farmers have resigned themselves to switching to dicamba-resistant soybeans just to stay in business. The story below, continued in the Washington Post, highlights some of the issues that have been related in the news during the past year and emphasize the importance of a varied pest management program.

article by Caitlin Dewey, Washington Post

Clay Mayes slams on the brakes of his Chevy Silverado and jumps out with the engine running, yelling at a dogwood by the side of the dirt road as if it had said something insulting.

Its leaves curl downward and in on themselves like tiny, broken umbrellas. It’s the telltale mark of inadvertent exposure to a controversial herbicide called dicamba. Continue reading

Ranch Management University set for Oct. 9-13 on Texas A&M campus

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

From soil management to cattle, forage and wildlife, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Ranch Management University Oct. 9-13 in College Station will offer a little something for everyone, according to coordinators.

The workshop will meet at the G. Rollie White Visitor Center, 7707 Raymond Stotzer Parkway on the Texas A&M University campus, said Dr. Larry Redmon, Texas A&M University soil and crop sciences associate department head and AgriLife Extension program leader, College Station. Continue reading

Interseeding, Precision Planting and Management of Cover Crops in a Corn and Soybean Rotation

What will you learn?

At the conclusion of this webinar participants will be able to develop a prescription for interseeding cover crops, understand the potential benefits of the practice, and describe situations where it will have the most potential for success. Learn more…

Presenter(s):

  • Greg Roth, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Plant Science, Penn State University, University Park, PA

Continue reading

USDA research finds conservation tillage works better after first year

In Southeast Farm Press

An onslaught of the weed Palmer amaranth in the southeastern United States has left many farmers wondering if they should continue using environmentally friendly cover crops and conservation tillage or switch to conventional tillage.

Palmer amaranth is aggressive, drought tolerant, a prolific seed producer, and capable of developing resistance to glyphosate, known as Roundup. Because of that, thousands of acres in Alabama and elsewhere are at risk of being converted to conventional tillage, which may better control the weed, but increases soil erosion and threatens long-term soil productivity.  Continue reading

Weed control economical, yield-critical in corn

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Just how much water are weeds using in a corn crop, and is it more economical to treat or not is the focus of a Texas A&M AgriLife study.

Dr. Jourdan Bell, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agronomist in Amarillo, and her Texas A&M AgriLife Research graduate student Aislinn Walton have found in early results heavy weed pressure could result in a 100-bushels-per acre yield loss on a corn crop. Continue reading

Webinar: Privet Biology and Management in Southeastern Forests

You are invited to attend the latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry.

Title: Privet Biology and Management in Southeastern Forests

What will you learn?
 This webinar will cover privet biology, ecology, and management as it pertains to forests in the southeastern U.S. learn more here…

Presenters/Authors:

Dr. Nancy Loewenstein, Alabama Cooperative Extension System, Auburn University Continue reading