Protect trees when applying herbicides to weeds

by Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

It can take years for a tree to reach full maturity, but it only takes one or two seasons of damage to irreparably harm the biggest and most expensive piece of a well-designed landscape.

Drought, insects and blight can all cause damage to mature trees. But more often than not, when a mature tree takes a turn for the worse, the culprit may be human error. Continue reading

Diversity is necessary in weed control

in Southwest Farm Press

South Texas, or coastal Texas, is a unique region of the greater Southwest, marked by a sub-tropical climate, unique soils and a host of both advantages and disadvantages when it comes to agriculture.

The warmer climate allows for an extended growing season, and its relationship with the tropical Gulf of Mexico offers some clear advantages, like seasonal rains, but also unique challenges, not the least of which is an environment conducive to the rapid growth and propagation of noxious and damaging weed varieties. Continue reading

Tomorrow at 3 PM ET: Learn about a pigweed decision management tool

Herbicide resistance in Palmer amaranth (known as Palmer pigweed) is a serious issue in the Southern US and is spreading to several other states. Repeated use of a few herbicide mechanisms of action (MOA) without sufficient management diversity is the common cause of this resistance. A proactive resistance management strategy that integrates diverse chemical and non-chemical tools will help prevent/manage resistance and preserve the utility of available herbicide options.

This webinar provides a general overview and demonstration of a new Microsoft-Excel based decision support tool that guides informed decision making for effective management of this weed, with particular focus on soil seedbank management and profitability. Users can build their own management programs and see for themselves how effective their pigweed management program is, as well as overall economic outcomes associated with their options. This tool also predicts the likely risk of resistance for the management program built by the user.

Date and time: Wednesday, February 15, at 3 PM Eastern time Continue reading

Mid-winter weed IPM

From the Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture

by Greg Huber, University of Georgia

Weeds can be a major pest of lawns and recreation fields, competing for resources and sunlight while detracting from their natural beauty.

If your spring checklist includes lawn weed management, now is the time to take a closer look at the tiny mat of weed seedlings forming in mid-winter (Jan-Feb.), especially during spells of mild weather and precipitation. The winter-weed inventory is likely to include a mix of early-stage cool-season annual and perennial weeds such as chickweed, henbit, clover, annual bluegrass, burweed, and wild garlic. One advantage of mid-winter weed scouting and management is that many weeds are in the early growth stages and can be effectively controlled by herbicide treatments. In addition, warm-season turfgrasses such as bermudagrass and zoysiagrass are dormant and less susceptible to herbicide injury than during spring green up. Mid-winter is an excellent time to scout for cool-season weed species and get an early jump on management while conditions are favorable. Continue reading

Spring Landscape Irrigation Short Courses offered in Texas

by Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife

A series of landscape irrigation short courses for licensed irrigation professionals will be held February through May with stops in College Station, Houston, Austin, Dallas and San Antonio.

Licensed landscape irrigators are required to have 24 hours of continued education every three years to renew their licenses, while licensed irrigation technicians need 16 hours every two years, said Charles Swanson, short course instructor and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service program specialist in College Station. Continue reading

New software to control pigweeds

NOTE: One of the PDs on this project, Muthu Bagavathiannan, will be conducting a webinar on use of this software next Wednesday, February 15, at 3 PM Eastern time. To find out more information, or to register, click this link.

This article was originally in Delta Farm Press.

As Mid-South pigweeds continue to be stubborn and hard to control, methods to combat them are expanding. In mid-January, the University of Arkansas released a software package (http://bit.ly/2kBMIwn) to assist growers in making informed decisions managing Palmer amaranth.

“It’s a unique software tool in that you can select whether you have glyphosate resistance, ALS resistance, or PPO resistance,” says Jason Norsworthy, weed scientist.  “From there, you devise potential herbicide management strategies over a 10-year period. We’re very proud of the program.” Continue reading

Options to address ryegrass for warm-season forage production

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Producers hoping to mitigate annual ryegrass growth for warm-season hay production have options and should start sooner than later, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

Annual ryegrass, a cool-season forage, is often utilized by livestock producers for winter grazing, said Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, AgriLife Extension forage specialist, Overton. However, East Texas hay producers often view it as an unwanted species that competes with Bermuda and Bahia grasses, she said. Continue reading