Weed resistance becoming a problem in Southeast wheat crop

The Carolinas and Virginia planted an extra 250,000 acres of wheat this past fall, compared to the fall of 2011 to take advantage of continued good prices for wheat and reflective of continued high prices for soybeans that can be planted in a double-crop/double-value economic scenario.

Getting wheat planted in the fall came with a few hitches, starting with finding enough seed in the desired varieties. Less than optimum seed supplies in the fall could have some yield-limiting consequences when wheat is harvested during May and June in the region.

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University of Nebraska holds Plant Recognition webinars

A special seminar series on the topic of “Plant Recognition and Identification Technology” will be held later this month at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Three well-known speakers will talk about the latest in agricultural automation, computer vision for species recognition, and challenges and opportunities for robotic weeding. Part of the focus of these seminars is to build collaborative relationships in this rapidly advancing field of research.

Please plan on joining experts at Lincoln or online for one or all of the seminars. For information about the seminar series, visit http://bigideaseminars.unl.edu/home, which has all of the details.

“Dinosaur” herbicides coming back because of weed resistance

2,4-D is coming back. What many might consider a “dinosaur” may be the best solution for growers fighting weed resistance today, says Dean Riechers, University of Illinois associate professor of weed physiology. “Farmers can’t imagine going back to 2,4-D or other auxin herbicides,” Riechers says. “But herbicide resistance is bad enough that companies are willing to bring it back. That illustrates how severe this problem is.”

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