WSSA Seeking New NIFA Fellow

The Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) is seeking a qualified individual to serve as a Weed Science resource for USDA’s National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and to act as a liaison between WSSA members and USDA-NIFA employees.  Dr. Donn Shilling from the University of Georgia has served in this role for the past three years, but plans to step down from this position in 2018.  Our intention is for Donn and the new NIFA Fellow to initially work together during the transition period.  Ideally, the new individual will travel to Washington, D.C. approximately once every 6 – 8 weeks to interact and work with USDA-NIFA employees during the week.  The NIFA Fellow will provide input on a wide range of topics such as current weed management practices, herbicide resistance management, weed biology and ecology, invasive plants, and the potential for new weed management paradigms such as the use of weed genomics and intelligent weed removal technologies.  A key role for the NIFA Fellow is to connect USDA-NIFA staff with WSSA committees and members to leverage their expertise to address these and other Weed Science topics. Continue reading

More precautions needed when spraying with dicamba and 2,4-D

From the Weed Science Society of America

New resistant soybean and cotton cropping systems based on the synthetic auxin herbicides give farmers new options for managing Palmer amaranth and other broadleaf weeds resistant to glyphosate. But scientists with the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) say special precautions are necessary. Auxin herbicides are known to drift and to cause harm to sensitive, off-target broadleaf plants.

“Concerns about drift led the U.S. EPA to issue time-limited registrations for the auxin herbicides dicamba and 2,4-D of two years and five years respectively,” says Kevin Bradley, Ph.D., past president of WSSA and associate professor at the University of Missouri. “The approved product labels have considerable detail on management of drift and other risks and must be carefully followed to reduce off site movement. Unless growers show they can use these herbicides as labeled, the registrations could easily be revoked.” Continue reading

What do farmers think about resistant weeds?

in Southeast Farm Press

Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. However, there have been few organized opportunities for farmers to make their voices heard and to share their experiences in managing herbicide-resistant weeds.

This is changing with a series of seven regional listening sessions sponsored by the Weed Science Society of America, the United Soybean Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Farmers across the nation are being invited to share their challenges, successes and opinions. Continue reading