Insects, diseases are up this year, wheat acreage is down in Louisiana

In Delta Farm Press

by Rick Bogren, LSU AgCenter

Wheat acreage in Louisiana is at an all-time low of 58,000 to 60,000 acres, LSU AgCenter experts said at the April 20th wheat and oat field day at AgCenter Macon Ridge Research Station.

Low prices, scab disease in 2015 and wet weather at planting are the reasons, said Boyd Padgett, AgCenter wheat specialist. In particular, scab disease “left a bad taste in growers’ mouths.” Continue reading

Wheat scab is “disaster waiting to happen” in North Carolina

In Southeast Farm Press

Christina Cowger urges North Carolina wheat producers to be prepared for fusarium head blight or scab this year by monitoring their risks and signing up for free scab alerts from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative before April which is the next scab season for the state.

Speaking at the North Carolina Commodities Conference in Durham Jan. 15, Cowger, small gains pathologist at North Carolina State University, said the alerts are free and delivered by text or email. Signing up is easy at the website www.scabusa.org that allows farmers to actually look at their scab risk. The website includes daily in-season risk maps for each locale and provides scab prediction based on geography, grain type and forecast weather patterns. Continue reading

Wheat scab starting in Mid-south

In Delta Farm Press

This is a nice time of the year in the Mid-South. Temperatures are warming, the rains are starting to become less frequent and dark-green fields of grain are waving in the breeze in parts of the country where farmers still sow winter wheat.

Unfortunately, farmers in Louisiana and some parts of Arkansas have begun observing fields where the grain is not so green and, in fact, is beginning to show the telltale signs of bleaching that generally accompany infections by Fusarium head blight or scab.

Continue reading