USDA Awards $3.4 Million for Research to Increase Wheat Yields

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced the award of $3.4 million for research into the development of new wheat varieties that are adapted to different geographical regions and environmental conditions. The seven projects are funded through NIFA’s new International Wheat Yield Partnership (IWYP) program, part of the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI).

“Wheat delivers a significant amount of daily nutrients for American families and people around the world, “said NIFA Director Sonny Ramaswamy. “As demand for wheat grows with the population, wheat research plays a vital role in meeting that need. These grants help support agricultural researchers developing new wheat varieties with greater yield and help us improve global collaboration on wheat research.” Continue reading

Texas wheat producers eye canola in crop rotations

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Texas A&M AgriLife Research is conducting several studies on canola in both the Rolling Plains and High Plains regions as interest in the crop continues to grow.

The canola plots were showcased recently at field days at both the AgriLife Research Chillicothe Station, south of Chillicothe in the Rolling Plains, and at the AgriLife Research Bush Farm, 600 Farm-to-Market Road 2381 north of Bushland in the Panhandle. Continue reading

NCSU experts says tillage provides better Italian ryegrass control

in Southeast Farm Press

Researchers at North Carolina State University are looking to cultural practices as a way to help control Italian ryegrass in wheat.

In 2014 and 2015, N.C. State scientists examined how row spacing and tillage practices impact Italian ryegrass in wheat. “We didn’t see any result with row spacing. If Italian ryegrass is going to come in, it’s going to come in regardless how dense that wheat is,” said N.C. State Extension Weed Specialist Wes Everman, speaking the Northeast Ag Expo Small Grain Field Day in Elizabeth City. “The tillage practices are where we saw some real differences.” Continue reading

Hessian fly pressure not as bad this year, but growers should still be watchful

In Southeast Farm Press

by Paul L. Hollis, Auburn University College of Agriculture

Climate predictions for the upcoming fall and winter months indicate that Alabama wheat producers will have fewer problems this season with the Hessian fly, but now’s not the time to completely let down your guard.

Results of studies have shown that Hessian fly infestation and yield losses are least during an El Niño climate event—a wetter and cooler phase—which is the forecast for the coming months.

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Texas producers delaying wheat planting due to grasshoppers

High Plains wheat producers who are normally ready to put seed in the ground might want to hold off this year, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialists in Amarillo.

With the extremely heavy pressure from grasshoppers, as well as other insects and diseases due to the wet year, waiting until the growing plants or  “green bridge,” is broken is advisable, said Dr. Jourdan Bell, AgriLife Extension agronomist, and Dr. Ed Bynum, AgriLife Extension entomologist.

“While we know wheat producers generally begin to plant in September, it really would be best if they could wait until mid-October to avoid grasshoppers and other issues,” Bell said. “The risk will be losing some of the grazing in the fall, but wheat that is planted earlier is more susceptible to insects and pathogens.” Continue reading

UK Wheat Science field day fast approaching

It’s time for small grain producers interested in receiving the latest research and information to make plans to attend the 2015 University of Kentucky Wheat Field Day.

Hosted by the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the field day is from 8:30 a.m. CDT until noon May 12 at UK Research Farm in Princeton.

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When you’re doing burndown, be careful about what’s nearby

From an article in Delta Farm Press

by Bob Scott, University of Arkansas

Burndown and planting is in full swing in southeast Arkansas as I am writing this article. We are still pretty wet, however, in some areas up north. When we are anxious to plant, we tend to take risks. Watch out for wheat fields and other sensitive areas while trying to make last minute burn-down and pre applications. In particular, be aware that at this time of year, wheat is extremely sensitive to Roundup drift.

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