ATTRA Tipsheet Can Help You Control Whiteflies

Whiteflies are tiny, white insects that cause crop losses on a global scale. This tipsheet, “Whiteflies – Botanical Control Formulations,” offers advice and direction on eliminating these pests through botanical pesticides.

Download the publication free at https://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/summaries/summary.php?pub=576. Continue reading

Cucurbit leaf crumple virus verified in south Georgia

In Southeast Farm Press

by Stormy Sparks and Bhabesh Dutta, University of Georgia

While we have all been bracing for the potential onslaught of silverleaf whiteflies, the one bright spot was that the viral diseases that caused the bigger disasters in 2016 had not been seen in 2017. This is no longer the case.

Cucurbit leaf crumple virus, which decimated snap beans and squash last fall, has been verified from squash in South Georgia (the week of Aug. 1). As with the whiteflies, this first occurrence is earlier than the disease was detected last year. This has also occurred at lower whitefly densities than last fall, which suggests the potential that a fair percentage of whiteflies may already be carrying the virus. Continue reading

Experts expect insect problems to get worse

in Southeast Farm Press

From whiteflies in southern Georgia to bollworms in North Carolina to plant bugs in Virginia, 2016 was a challenging insect year for cotton growers across the Southeast. Dominic Reisig is urging farmers to be prepared for another challenging year.

Reisig, North Carolina State University Extension entomologist, addressed “Emerging Insect Issues in the Southeast” at the annual meeting of the Southern Cotton Growers and Southeastern Cotton Ginners in Charlotte, N.C., Jan. 20, where he provided an insect situation, outlook report and control recommendations. Continue reading

Georgia vegetable growers battling whiteflies this fall

by Kyle Dawson, University of Georgia

Whitefly populations in south Georgia have exploded over the past several weeks, troubling vegetable producers during the fall growing season, according to University of Georgia horticulturist Tim Coolong.

Coolong said growers must be up to date on spray programs, though combating whitefly populations of this magnitude will still be difficult. In some cases it might be impossible to to stop whiteflies before they spread viruses. Continue reading

Focus on Cotton webcast discusses whiteflies and related viruses

In Delta Farm Press

by the National Cotton Council

Whiteflies and the viruses they carry have been a large, complex, and economically significant problem for cotton growers throughout the world. Whiteflies pick up viruses from a range of host plants near cotton fields, transmit them to cotton plants, and can continue to do so throughout the rest of their lifetime. In the cases of cotton leaf curl virus and cotton leaf curl disease, this ends with all-too-common results: the curling of leaves, and/or the development of leaf-like enations on the undersides of leaves, overall stunting of the plant, and reduced yield and quality.

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Tomato yellow leaf curl virus getting worse in Georgia

In Southeast Farm Press

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus has been a chronic threat to tomato production in south Georgia for more than a decade. The problem is only getting worse.

A University of Georgia researcher says eradicating the disease may not be possible. However, work continues to be done to help farmers select resistant varieties and manage their risks.

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