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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Scale insects more abundant at higher temperatures

A study by two researchers at North Carolina State University concludes that damaging scale insects are more abundant in urban heat islands.

Read more at http://entomologytoday.org/2014/07/25/city-heat-boosts-tree-killing-scale-insect-populations/

North Carolina turfgrass field day in August

N.C. State University’s annual Turfgrass Field Day will be held in Raleigh at the Lake Wheeler Turfgrass Research Lab, Aug. 13, 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. One of the largest events of its kind in the country, the field day offers the industry and general public a chance to view the Turfgrass Program’s ongoing research trials and speak directly with N.C. State faculty and staff.

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National Center for Appropriate Technology Seeks Sustainable Agriculture Specialist

NCAT has an opening in our Southwest Regional Office for a sustainable agriculture specialist.  The specialist will work directly with farmers and ranchers on crop and livestock production, soil health, water quality, organic certification, and other topics.

Join our team and take advantage of this great opportunity to promote sustainable farming and ranching and strengthen local and regional food systems in Texas, New Mexico, and the Southwest.

A minimum of a bachelors degree is required, along with hands-on farm-based experience. The position will be located at NCAT’s San Antonio, TX office.

Click here for a complete list of qualifications needed and job responsibilities, and to start your application.

Applications only accepted until August 24th!

First Chikungunya case acquired in the United States reported in Florida

Seven months after the mosquito-borne virus chikungunya was recognized in the Western Hemisphere, the first locally acquired case of the disease has surfaced in the continental United States. The case was reported today in Florida in a male who had not recently traveled outside the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working closely with the Florida Department of Health to investigate how the patient contracted the virus; CDC will also monitor for additional locally acquired U.S. cases in the coming weeks and months.

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Mississippi leads nation in number of herbicide-resistant weed species

In this video at Delta Farm Press, Darrin Dodds says that it’s a dubious honor that Mississippi leads the nation in the number of glyphosate-resistant weeds — and pigweed (Palmer amaranth) is now at the top of that list, he said at the annual joint meeting of the Mississippi Boll Weevil Management Corporation and the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Cotton Policy Committee. He discussed the issue with Farm Press Editorial Director Hembree Brandon.

Mid-South grain sorghum faces messy new pest

From Delta Farm Press

White sugarcane aphids are on the move in Mid-South grain sorghum and are making a sticky mess in some fields, according to Extension entomologists.

The aphid (Melanaphis sacchari) has been found this season in Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Mississippi and Arkansas.

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Are you a good stink bug or a bad stink bug?

Southeast Farm Press has a photo gallery of 6 species of stink bugs, some pests and others beneficial (yes, they’re not all bad).

Click here to see the gallery.

For the identification, look at the right of the screen, right above the advertisement.

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