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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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How IPM can help with “superweeds”

Yesterday Paul Hollis from Southeast Farm Press wrote an eloquent and fact-filled blog about the myths behind “superweeds,” based on a new fact sheet published by the Weed Science Society of America. Mr. Hollis does an excellent job at explaining the points in the fact sheet, so you can read his article if you’d like to know how the “superweed” has become an average household word that, in fact, very few people understand.

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NIFA Awards $16 Million in Grants to Address Integrated Pest Management

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced more than $16 million in grants to support research and extension activities addressing critical integrated pest management (IPM) needs. The new resources will protect crops and livestock, ensure greater food security and effectively respond to other major societal challenges.

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Take care to avoid Halloween surprises

Southeast Farm Press lists a few areas that livestock managers should be aware of this fall, especially concerning toxic weeds and chemical pesticides:

1. Examine temporary pastures or fields that are unfamiliar. Often toxic weeds such as sicklepod and deadly nightshade grow around trees and water troughs.

2. Know what herbicides have been used on legume seeds before adding them to grazing materials. Legumes are particularly susceptible to herbicides.

3. Be sure to store pesticides, fertilizers and other chemicals that may inadvertently be left uncovered in a field, where an active calf can kick them over and taste them.

Read the full article in Southeast Farm Press.

EPA launches new program to reduce pesticide drift

The EPA is announcing a new voluntary Drift Reduction Technology (DRT) program to encourage the use of verified, safer pesticide spray products to reduce exposure and pesticide movement while saving farmers money in pesticide loss.

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Hunters help farmers with feral hogs in Georgia

In Southeast Farm Press

Wild hogs. Feral pigs. No matter the term, hogs can be a big problem, especially for landowners who depend on their property to supply crops that provide for their livelihood. Hunters Helping Farmers is a new program to help alleviate the agricultural and financial damage caused by these non-native invasive pests.

“It is a natural fit to connect hunters and farmers together to try and help solve this growing problem,” says Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black. ‘”In no way will this be a silver bullet, but hopefully one small way we can help assist in this huge issue for our farmers.”

Read the rest of the story in Southeast Farm Press.

Research ongoing for target spot disease

Auburn University researcher Austin Hagan explains that researchers are finding options to deal with target spot, which will be helpful for cotton growers in south Alabama, where disease pressure is highest. Southeast Farm Press discusses some of his findings, which he explains during a field day in Headland, AL.

Many questions remain about how to treat target spot on cotton, but researchers do know that under the right conditions, it can lead to significant yield losses.

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How to deal with mice

As the weather gets cooler, small mammals such as mice and rats look for warmth, sometimes in your home. The Pennsylvania IPM Program has a great fact sheet on how you can tell if you have mice in your house, along with the best ways to get rid of them. Below is information from the fact sheet, but go to their website if you want a printable copy.

Why Use IPM to Control Mice?

  • More likely to give long-term control
  • Less hazardous to human health
  • Less risk to nontarget organisms
  • More cost effective
  • More site appropriate

Steps to Managing Mice

Step 1: Pest Identification
Find out what kind of pest you have to make sure it is a mouse or a rat, if possible. Mice that infest houses are typically 5–8 inches long, including a long, hairless tail. They have large ears and their droppings are pointed, about the size of a grain of rice. Rats are much larger, 13–18 inches in length, including a short tail. Their droppings are blunt, about the size of a small raisin. Continue reading

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