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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Scientists find possible biological control for redbay ambrosia beetle

Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a few fungal biological control options that show promise for fighting the redbay ambrosia beetle. They discuss the results of their experiments in a refereed article in Biological Control.

The redbay ambrosia beetle (RAB) was first discovered in southeast Georgia in 2002. A native of Asia, the beetle transmits a pathogen that causes laurel wilt, a disease that can kill an infected tree in just a couple of years. The beetle attacks trees in the family Lauracea, which includes redbay, swampbay, sassafras and avocado.

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New technology to be explored at UK Winter Wheat Meeting

Grain growers will soon get a firsthand look at a new mobile tool to help them make real-time, informed decisions on their fields at the University of Kentucky Wheat Science Group’s annual winter meeting Jan. 6.

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Symposium in Savannah will highlight benefits of grafting for vegetables

The 3rd National Vegetable Grafting Symposium: “Growing New Roots for the Vegetable Industry in the U.S.” will be Jan. 8, 2015 at the Savannah International Trade and Convention Center in conjunction with the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference.

The symposium will feature presentations on propagation technology, decision making, grafting uses in season extension as well as successes and challenges from researchers, growers and industry members from the U.S. and around the world. Exhibitors will also be present that will be providing product and service information.

Read the rest of the story in Southeast Farm Press.

APHIS seeks comments on proposed biological control for citrus psyllid

Excerpted from Logan Hawkes’s article in Southwest Farm Press

The U.S. citrus industry has been facing a serious threat from a disease that has spread from the East coast to the West Coast over the course of the last two decades, carried by a small insect that feeds on the leaves and stems of citrus trees.

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IPM-Related Presentations at the 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum

On February 19 and 20 the USDA Office of the Chief Economist will host the Agricultural Outlook Forum in Arlington, Virginia. The Theme is Smart Agriculture for the 21st Century: A Discussion on Innovation, Biotechnology and Big Data. IPM-related topics include a break-out session on pollinator health including “Diseases & Pesticides Affecting Bee Health” and “Bees on the Farm” on February 20th and another breakout session later that same day around antimicrobial resistance. The bioeconomy or economic activity derived from scientific and research activity focused on biotechnology is the theme for yet another breakout session on February 20th.

Upgrades to Endangered Species Web Tool: Bulletins Live! Two

EPA is releasing Bulletins Live! Two, an upgraded version of Bulletins Live!, a web-based map application used to access geographically-specific threatened and endangered species protection Bulletins. This system is an important tool for pesticide users since it makes it easier to find pesticide use limitations for specific areas. Go to www.epa.gov/oppfead1/endanger/bulletins.htm to view the new application. Please note, if you are using Internet Explorer and have accessed Bulletins Live! in the past, you will need to clear your history or set your browser to check for newer versions of stored pages.

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How Could IPM Have Helped?

This story appears in the School IPM 2020 Newsletter this month.

San Ysidro School District, San Diego, California is battling an unresolved lawsuit over alleged pesticide use, incurring $35,000 in legal costs as of last month. According to media reports, in 2011, teacher Josie Hamada took her students to a cherry tree grove on school property to draw and write about trees. After clearing some weeds, Hamada found herself contaminated with a blue substance which she suspected was a pesticide. Students were quickly moved inside to wash up. Health complaints followed, including at least one student’s trip to a hospital the next day.

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