Rare leafhopper found in shipment in Delaware

A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist confirmed Wednesday that Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists at Washington Dulles International Airport discovered a new pest in the Washington area when they intercepted, Agallia constricta cubana, a leafhopper, while inspecting an air cargo shipment of basil from Mexico on December 17.

The leafhopper belongs to a family of cicadellidae. Leafhoppers are known to transmit viruses and bacteria to other plants that can affect plant growth, fruit production, and can make the plant susceptible to infections by other pathogens.

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Predator beetle successfully reducing adelgid populations in Smokies

From the Charlotte Observer

The granddaddy trees of North Carolina’s mountains are skeletons on many slopes.

Hemlocks that might have lived for 800 years can die in as few as five, victims of tiny, sap-sucking bugs.

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Methyl Bromide Transition RFA released

The FY 2015 Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program – Methyl Bromide Transition (MBT) RFA is now available for public viewing.

DEADLINE: May 4, 2015

NIFA Funding Opportunity Page: http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transitions

Grants.gov Page: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=275311. This page includes a synopsis of the funding opportunity, a link to the full announcement (RFA) and the application package.

Communication between beekeepers and producers helps both sides

In Delta Farm Press

Hear some buzzing in your walls? See a few too many bees crawling around your eaves? The Bartlett Bee Whisperer is only a call away.

“My main business is running a honeybee rescue service,” says David Glover, the Memphis-based beekeeper. “That’s removing honey bees that have moved into people’s homes. I’ll come in and remove the bees, the wax, and the honeycomb. I typically box them up and move them to farms. Other times, I’ll find beekeepers in the Memphis area –we have good folks that have anywhere from two to 2,000 hives — that need replacements for bees they’ve lost throughout the year.”

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Got fire ants? This eXtension site can help

Article written by Mike Merchant, Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Entomologist, in his blog Insects in the City

Fire ants remain the most prevalent outdoor ant pest in most areas of the southern U.S.  Throughout the U.S. we estimate the annual cost of fire ant control at over $6 billion.  But the cost of this pest goes far beyond measurable dollars.  Fire ants reduce the recreational value of our parks and backyards, disrupt wildlife populations, and send thousands to emergency rooms each year from their painful stings.

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EPA Registers New Miticide to Combat Varroa Mites in Bees

EPA is registering a new miticide, oxalic acid, to combat the devastating effects of the Varroa mite on honey bee colonies. Oxalic acid is currently registered for this use in Canada and Europe. Recognizing beekeepers’ need for additional registered tools to combat the Varroa mite in U.S. honey bee colonies, the EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Agricultureon the registration.

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Wheat diseases to look out for in the spring

From the UT Crops News Blog

Once we start to thaw out from winter, wheat as well as diseases will start to grow and develop. In some areas stripe rust has already shown up, which may indicate an increased disease risk in wheat this year.

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