Mid-South soybean farmers learning about consequences of not following label

In Delta Farm Press

by David Bennett, Delta Farm Press

When Monsanto’s Xtend soybeans were approved for planting this season, many applauded the move. After all, the technology means crops can be sprayed with dicamba and weeds are only becoming tougher to control. There was a huge caveat, though: while the seed could be planted, new, less volatile formulations of dicamba were not approved.

In the run up to planting, Mid-South growers were repeatedly warned over-the-top applications of available dicamba products would not be allowed. Even so, state officials fretted improper spraying would happen following a 2015 growing season when “some individuals — a very small group — used a dicamba product not labeled for this seed,” said Susie Nichols at the Arkansas State Plant Board in April. “That’s a big worry for the Plant Board; there’s a lot of Xtend soybean seed in the state. We’ve tried to let everyone know it’s a violation to use any dicamba product on this technology because none is labeled for this use. Continue reading

How to tell if you have chinch bug damage

Georgia FACES is the source of the following post. Original recommendations are for Georgians, but the information contained in the article is useful for homeowners throughout the Southeast. Author of the original article is Clint Thompson, University of Georgia. Some sentences have been edited to make the information more general to the Southeast.

The drought in the Southeast has damaged lawns and wilted gardens, but in many areas, the lack of rain has also brought on chinch bugs, a dry weather pest of St. Augustine and other turfgrass. Continue reading

‘Going Green’ with Stink Bug Control

In USDA Agricultural Research Service news

By Dennis O’Brien

A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist has found “green” alternatives to insecticides to control three native stink bugs that damage cotton, and the new methods are catching on with growers.

The green stink bug (Chinavia hilaris), southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula), and brown stink bug (Euschistus servus) are a particular problem in the southeastern United States, because cotton is often grown alongside peanuts. Brown and southern green stink bugs develop in peanut fields and migrate into cotton. Green stink bugs move into cotton from nearby wooded areas. Continue reading

APHIS Updates Gypsy Moth Outdoor Household Article Checklist

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has updated PPQ Form 377: Gypsy Moth Checklist and Record of Your Self-Inspection.  People who live in the gypsy moth quarantine area—generally the northeast quadrant of the contiguous United States—must use PPQ Form 377 to inspect their outdoor household goods for gypsy moth before they move to a non-infested area. The Federal gypsy moth regulations (Title 7 Code of Federal Regulations 301.45-4) require this action to prevent the human-assisted movement of this damaging pest of woody plants. A copy of the form must accompany the household goods during the move. This checklist may be completed by the person moving or by a qualified certified applicator. Once completed and signed, the checklist is an official certificate that will satisfy Federal requirements for interstate moves. Continue reading

Reducing your chances of getting bitten by ticks

Most people know about wearing insect repellent and long pants to prevent getting bitten by ticks, but there are also ways to reduce tick populations in your yards. For instance, making sure that loose leaves are kept to a minimum, treating heavily wooded areas with pesticides meant to kill ticks and mites, and treating some of the animal hosts for ticks are other ways to reduce tick numbers in your yard.

Read Entomology Today to see the detailed suggestions for how to protect yourself from ticks.

GMOs just one in a line of demonized tech, study finds

In AgFax

Disruptive, transformative technologies are being introduced at an accelerating pace, fuelling opposition that impedes forms of innovation needed to meet profound challenges such as climate change, poverty and world hunger, says a new study from Harvard University.

Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technology, by Prof. Calestous Juma of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, chronicles the history of opposition to change — from tractors and certain uses of the printing press to coffee and margarine — and its underlying reasons. Continue reading

Scientists gather, share updates on spread of stink bugs

At StopBMSB.org

by Chris Gonzales, Northeastern IPM Center

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Working Group Meeting was organized as a conference with presentations—however, as a working group, scientists frequently conversed and discussed topics during and after updates. Below, we give highlights and summaries of the presentations.

About thirty scientists gathered recently in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in a meeting sponsored by the Northeastern IPM Center, and discussed the persistent, steady spread of the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB). Continue reading

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