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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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IPM Enhancement Grant 2020 RFA Released!

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See the release here

New SIPMC Website and Blog

Has it been a while since you’ve heard from us?

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We have debuted a brand new website and a brand new newsletter that will be released monthly starting at the end of this month.  We also have a new option for our news, as we have started writing photo essays.

To get on our mailing list, just go to the homepage of our website, and click the subscribe button on the bottom right of your screen–Or click right here.

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There are many exciting things to come, so please subscribe to our newsletter and catch up on IPM news on our website, our photo essays, and on Facebook and Twitter.

2017 Census of Agriculture Released by the USDA

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The USDA has now released the 2017 Census of Agriculture including millions of data points, number of farms, land in farms, total value of production, demographics, and more at the national, state, and county levels.  The report includes the following:

“The census of agriculture provides a detailed picture of U.S. farms and ranches every five years. It is the leading source of uniform, comprehensive agricultural data for every State and county or county equivalent. Census of agriculture data are routinely used by agriculture organizations, businesses, State departments of agriculture, elected representatives and legislative bodies at all levels of government, public and private sector analysts, the news media, and colleges and universities. Census of agriculture data are frequently used to:

  • Show the importance and value of agriculture at the county, State, and national levels;
  • Provide agricultural news media and agricultural associations benchmark statistics for stories and articles on U.S. agriculture and the foods we produce;
  • Compare the income and costs of production;
  • Provide important data about the demographics and financial well-being of producers;
  • Evaluate historical agricultural trends to formulate farm and rural policies and develop programs that help agricultural producers;
  • Allocate local and national funds for farm programs, e.g. extension service projects, agricultural research, soil conservation programs, and land-grant colleges and universities;
  • Identify the assets needed to support agricultural production such as land, buildings, machinery, and other equipment;
  • Create an extensive database of information on uncommon crops and livestock and the value of those commodities for assessing the need to develop policies and programs to support those commodities;
  • Provide geographic data on production so agribusinesses will locate near major production areas for efficiencies for both producers and agribusinesses;
  • Measure the usage of modern technologies such as conservation practices, organic production, renewable energy systems, internet access, and specialized marketing strategies;
  • Develop new and improved methods to increase agricultural production and profitability;
  • Plan for operations during drought and emergency outbreaks of diseases or infestations of pests;
  • Analyze and report the current state of food, fuel, and fiber production in the United States; and
  • Make energy projections and forecast needs for agricultural producers and their communities.”

Southern Pine Beetle Resource

Side view southern pine beetle

Newly revised from the UF/IFAS Extension, comes an updated resource on the Southern Pine Beetle, or Dendroctonus frontalis.  This contribution, last updated in January 2019, includes useful information about the insect pest including:

  • Description
  • Biology
  • Hosts
  • Outbreaks
  • Monitoring
  • Prevention

southern pine beetle top

To see the electronic version of this resource visit the UF/IFAS Extension’s Electronic Data Information System (EDIS) or download the PDF here.

 

New Drone Technology has Potential to Save Citrus Trees and Money

 

A new study from the University of Florida found that using drone technology can “save growers time, money, and labor costs.”  Instead of manually counting the number of trees in groves, these drones give farmers the ability to more accurately represent numbers of citrus trees, while also gaining the ability to monitor trees’ health, traits, and location.

Drone demonstration at the NC State Fair. Photo by Marc Hall

 

 

Find the full article here.

Southeastern Crop Handbook 2019 Released

Hot off the press from American Vegetable Grower and in its twentieth iteration, the latest version of the Crop Handbook is now available for download.  This comes as a result of collaboration between researchers and specialists from 12 land-grant institutions across the United States.

To download a copy of the PDF, click here.

 

Crop Protection and Pest Management Funding Opportunity

NIFA Update Banner

Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM)

The purpose of the Crop Protection and Pest Management program is to address high priority issues related to pests and their management using IPM approaches at the state, regional and national levels. The CPPM program supports projects that will ensure food security and respond effectively to other major societal pest management challenges with comprehensive IPM approaches that are economically viable, ecologically prudent, and safe for human health. The CPPM program addresses IPM challenges for emerging issues and existing priority pest concerns that can be addressed more effectively with new and emerging technologies. The outcomes of the CPPM program are effective, affordable, and environmentally sound IPM practices and strategies needed to maintain agricultural productivity and healthy communities.

Who is eligible to apply:

1862 Land-Grant Institutions, 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, 1994 Land-Grant Institutions, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Other or Additional Information (See below), Private Institutions of Higher Ed, State Controlled Institutions of Higher Ed

More on Eligibility:

Applications may only be submitted by colleges and universities (as defined in section 1404 of NARETPA) (7 U.S.C. 3103) to the CPPM program. Section 1404 of NARETPA was amended by section 7101 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) to define Hispanic-serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACUs), and to include research foundations maintained by eligible colleges or universities. Section 406(b) of AREERA (7 U.S.C. 7626), was amended by section 7206 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 to add the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions as eligible to apply for grants under this authority. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. Failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the application deadline may result in the application being excluded from consideration or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from making an award.

Request for Applications

Apply for Grant

Posted Date: Friday, February 15, 2019

Closing Date: Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-CPPM-006536

Estimated Total Program Funding: $4,000,000