Nominate a colleague or student for a Friend of IPM award!

Now that the deadline for the IPM Enhancement Grants has passed, why not write a 2-page nomination for a colleague or student to win a Friends of Southern IPM award?

The deadline for nominations is Friday, December 16, 2016. Don’t miss your opportunity to nominate someone to compete for this award. Continue reading

EPA Clarifies Placement of Required First Aid Statements on Pesticide Product Labels

The Environmental Protection Agency is clarifying where first aid statements must be placed on pesticide product labels. First aid statements provide important information concerning appropriate first aid in the event of accidental exposure to a pesticide.

First aid statements must be immediately visible on a pesticide product when the product is sold or distributed. It should not require opening a booklet or other manipulation of the label to read the first aid statement. Continue reading

EPA Places Restrictions on Pesticide Use to Protect Four Endangered and Threatened Species

The Environmental Protection Agency is placing geographically specific pesticide use restrictions on the use of eight gas cartridge products containing sodium and potassium nitrate, carbon and carbon dioxide, and sulfur to protect four endangered and threatened (listed) species in certain areas of the United States. These include the gopher tortoise, Hualapai Mexican vole, Mount Graham red squirrel, and Utah prairie dog. Gas cartridge products are used to control burrowing mammals.

The restrictions can be found in EPA’s Endangered Species Protection Program BulletinsContinue reading

Invasive insects turn forests into wasteland

by Michael Casey and Patrick Whittle, Associated Press

In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it’s easy to miss one of the tree’s nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.

The bug is one in an expanding army of insects draining the life out of forests from New England to the West Coast. Aided by global trade, a warming climate and drought-weakened trees, the invaders have become one of the greatest threats to biodiversity in the United States. Continue reading

Kentucky Fruit and Vegetable Conference coming Jan. 9-10

by Aimee Nielson, University of Kentucky

The 2017 Kentucky Fruit and Vegetable Conference will have something of interest for all fruit and vegetable producers. The event runs from 8 a.m. EST Jan. 9 until 5 p.m. Jan. 10 at Lexington’s Embassy Suites Hotel.

Preconference activities on Jan. 8 will include tree fruit, small fruit and vegetable roundtable discussions as well as a plasticulture strawberry short course. Continue reading

Friends of Southern IPM Deadline – and news

For those of you who have already submitted, or are in the process of submitting a Friends of Southern IPM Award nomination, thank you. For those of you who are considering submitting or planning to submit, please take note of the following.

When you are filling out the form for submission, please place an amount in the “Funding” blank that is larger than 0. We have learned that the system is giving submitters an error when they place a 0 in the Funding blank. The number 1 or greater should get you past that section.

The Call for Nominations will be open until NEXT Friday, December 16, at 5 PM Eastern Time. If you are located somewhere that has Central Time, you must submit your nomination by 4 PM Central. Please do not wait until the last minute to submit a nomination, as sometimes there are unforeseen issues with the system or the server. Continue reading

Big data is coming to agriculture

By Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife

Unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous tractors and other technologies will continue to emerge as producers meet world food needs in the near and distant future, according to experts.

Those experts believe technology will continue to emerge and make possible giant leaps throughout the next decade as agriculture industries and producers work to meet world food needs in 2050. Continue reading

International conference highlighted strength of Texas spinach industry

by Paul Schattenberg, Texas A&M AgriLife

Texas’ billion-dollar spinach industry was the focus of the 2016 International Spinach Conference, which brought more than 80 people from various countries to San Antonio.

The two-day conference, coordinated by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, was attended by spinach growers and shippers, as well as others involved in the agricultural and scientific aspects of spinach production. Attendees were from the U.S., Canada, China, Denmark, England, Japan and the Netherlands. Continue reading