The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Regulated Area Expands in Kansas to include Atchison County

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Atchison County in Kansas to the list of regulated areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB). APHIS is taking this action in response to the detection of EAB in Atchison County.

To prevent the spread of EAB to other states, the attached Federal Order outlines specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined areas in Kansas. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas in Kansas is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species. Continue reading

New Guidance on Environmental Control of Candida auris with Antimicrobial Pesticides

Last fall the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified drug resistant Candida auris infections in hospitals in the United States. At that time, CDC issued a clinical alert on Candida to U.S. healthcare facilities and has recently revised its recommendation to include thorough daily and after-discharge cleaning of rooms of C. auris patients using EPA-registered hospital disinfectants active against Clostridium difficile. The previous recommendation was to use a hospital disinfectant effective against fungi. CDC’s disinfection recommendations for C. auris will continue to be updated as new information becomes available.

Drug resistant C. auris is a fungus that poses a global health threat and may cause serious and sometimes fatal fungal infections. C. auris infections tend to occur in hospitalized patients and can be resistant to antifungal drugs. Continue reading

PhD Fellowships Available in Tick Pathogen Discovery

The National Institute for Microbial Forensics and Food and Agricultural Biosecurity (NIMFFAB) and the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences (CVHS) at Oklahoma State University are pleased to announce the availability of two graduate fellowships for highly qualified, motivated graduate students to pursue the PhD degree while completing mentored research in bioinformatics and pathogen discovery. Available projects involve microbiome and transcriptome analysis of ticks using next generation sequencing and novel platform queries to characterize new and emerging tick-borne pathogens of veterinary and public health importance. English fluency and basic programming skills are required; additional training in bioinformatics is recommended.

For more information, contact vbsc@okstate.edu or visit the Graduate College Application page to begin an application. Oklahoma State University is an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity.

Protect trees when applying herbicides to weeds

by Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

It can take years for a tree to reach full maturity, but it only takes one or two seasons of damage to irreparably harm the biggest and most expensive piece of a well-designed landscape.

Drought, insects and blight can all cause damage to mature trees. But more often than not, when a mature tree takes a turn for the worse, the culprit may be human error. Continue reading

Diversity is necessary in weed control

in Southwest Farm Press

South Texas, or coastal Texas, is a unique region of the greater Southwest, marked by a sub-tropical climate, unique soils and a host of both advantages and disadvantages when it comes to agriculture.

The warmer climate allows for an extended growing season, and its relationship with the tropical Gulf of Mexico offers some clear advantages, like seasonal rains, but also unique challenges, not the least of which is an environment conducive to the rapid growth and propagation of noxious and damaging weed varieties. Continue reading

Seminar on Best practices for National Institute of Food and Agriculture funding success: A 25 year perspective

From the Connection, North Central IPM Center

Although this seminar is targeted for nutritionists, anyone with an interest in pursuing USDA funding will glean information from Dr. Jaykus’s experience.

Dr. Lee-Ann Jaykus, North Carolina State University, will present “Best practices for National Institute of Food and Agriculture funding success: A twenty year perspective” from 3-4 p.m. Eastern on Feb.23, 2017. The seminar can be viewed via Adobe Connect as well as in Room 3310 of the Waterfront Building, Washington, DC. This seminar has been approved by the Commission on Dietetic Registration for 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Unit (CEU).*

This seminar is part of the Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition (IFSN) Seminar Series. These monthly seminars aim to disseminate new knowledge; engage with partners and stakeholders; and inspire the next generation of food safety and nutrition experts. For full information on the series, visit the seminar webpage. Continue reading

UK helps producer renovate hayfield

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

When Anderson County livestock producer Mike Wilson bought a 60-acre hayfield in Franklin County, he knew he had a lot of work in front of him.

The previous owners had let people cut hay for nearly 30 years without putting any nutrients back into the ground, which meant the existing grass stand was a mixture of Kentucky 31 tall fescue and weeds. Continue reading